The no-nonsense guide to getting tattooed! PART 2 – During

In our first instalment, I talked to you guys about the ‘before’ process in getting your tattoo.

It probably frustrated a lot of people that I didn’t get into the real meat of actually getting tattooed, but I wouldn’t have felt comfortable without laying the whole process out, I wouldn’t have been giving you the whole picture.

So today let’s focus on the super fun and pretty painful bit! ‘During’!

GET THERE ON TIME!

I shouldn’t really have to say this at all. As a responsible adult, who has taken the time to get to this point and book your appointment, you should WANT to be there on time!

Being late creates all kinds of problems for yourself and your tattoo artist. If you’re rushing and get there late, you’re going to create a bit of tension from the offset, and work yourself up. This isn’t good, as you’re spending the next few hours with this person tattooing your skin. You don’t want to create an awkward environment, or make your tattoo artist think you’re not as serious as you should be about your appointment.

If you think you are going to be late, for whatever reason, just call ahead and let your artist know. Then apologise when you get there. Artists understand that there are some things you just can’t control, but if you give them the heads up, they can be sure you are still coming, and you’re not going to be a no-show.

DON’T BRING AN ENTOURAGE

Unless previously agreed with your artist, it’s not usually a good idea to bring friends with you to watch you get tattooed.

Having friends and family present can be distracting for both yourself and your tattoo artist. Your guest may feel the need to give their opinion on the design of your tattoo, or may create an atmosphere that puts the artist under great pressure.

I feel most comfortable when I turn up to my appointments alone, as I can really connect with my tattoo artist and create a very personal experience.

BE PATIENT AND BE HONEST!

Your artist will have to set up for your appointment, so you may have a little wait at the studio. There will sometimes be a selection of tattoo magazines for you to flick through, and you may even be offered a cup of tea while you wait. Modern tattoo studios are very welcoming places, and nothing like the stereotypical, intimidating, testosterone filled shops of the past.

Your artist will show you a line drawing of your tattoo around this point.. They want to know whether this is what you had in mind, and they want you to be honest. If you have communicated with your artist well up to this point, it will be everything you hoped for and more!

If there are elements that you would like to change, your tattoo artists needs to know this. They are aware that this piece is on you forever, and they want to give you the best! Things like sizing, positioning of small elements like background flowers etc, colour choices, wording positioning and the actual positioning of the tattoo on your body, can all be tweaked a little before you start. Please don’t be afraid of asking for something like this to be changed!

If you find you totally hate the design (which is very unlikely if you have done your research), then you must still say something. It’s likely in this case that you would have to re-arrange your appointment, and you may lose your deposit. Please do not argue with your tattoo artist about this, they need time to make sure they get your vision right!

When you are happy with your design, it’s time to apply the carbon paper transfer to your skin! At this point, it all gets pretty real, and nerves may kick in…

STAY CALM!

These days, I’m usually excited about getting tattooed. I tend to prepare myself for the inevitable pain by just letting myself get super stoked about the design itself!

If this is your first tattoo, I’m not going to tell you it doesn’t really hurt, or it’s not as bad as you think (because I don’t know what you are thinking) But I will say, it’s really not the worst pain in the world. At all. You can deal with it, and as soon as it’s over, you will forget all about it.

If you feel you are panicking, faint, nervous or sick, please tell your artist immediately. They will only start your tattoo when they know you are comfortable. Take a breather, pop to the loo, make sure you are comfy in the chair and keep yourself calm.

During your tattoo, you may find there are a number of things you can do to distract from the pain. I like to count things, like ceiling tiles or floorboards, I don’t know why it works, but it does! I also find that watching the artist working on the tattoo calms me down, but I guess that makes me weird because most other people I know HATE watching it. Just do what you think is best!

BE FRIENDLY!

Some of the time, you may find that an artist doesn’t seem to say much. This is because a lot of artists take their cues from you, as their customer. They do not want to distract or upset you by talking to you, if you don’t deal well with conversation whilst being tattooed. Don’t let this put you off starting a conversation though, as conversation is one of the best ways of managing pain and creating a distraction for you.

I will mention at this point, that a real studio doesn’t work like the ones you see on those tattoo ‘reality’ TV shows. You’re artist is not there to be your therapist, and it can be a little odd for them to have to listen to someone pour their heart out, and explain their reasons for getting a tattoo. If you want to talk about it, that’s great, but try keep it light and concise. On TV, the customers share their long and elaborate stories for the benefit of the cameras and the audience at home. There are no cameras here, so you really don’t have to lay it on thick.

Have a laugh and a joke, or sit in the peaceful quiet. Either is good, just make sure you are doing everything you can do to create a positive and awesome atmosphere!

COMMUNICATE

Need a pee? Need to wiggle your fingers, stretch your arm/leg/torso or take a five minute breather? Let your artist know! They can’t read your mind, and they want you to be as comfortable as possible whilst they work on your tattoo.

It can be hard, but it’s best to keep as still as possible while the artist is actually working on your skin. Moving a little to get comfortable is fine, but usually it is best if you let them know you need to reposition yourself.

It is important to remember that there is absolutely no need to cause a scene for attention. Your artist is already giving you and your tattoo all of their attention, and it is actually very distracting for them if you wiggle , scream, squeal, shriek and cry for dramatic effect. In the long run, if you squirm around and cause the tattooist to have to stop and start the whole way through, you may end up having to pay more, as the tattoo took longer than expected. Try to keep those yelps and wriggles to yourself, it’s in your best interests to stay still and try not to whinge and be negative!

DON’T BE NOSEY

There’s nothing wrong with asking questions, but please be aware of what you are asking. It’s fine to enquire about things, but most tattoo artists find it distracting and unsettling if customers ask questions about brands of ink, types of machines, and other industry specific paraphernalia.

They know you are just curious, but they may want to keep some things to themselves. If you want to know about the sterilisation of equipment, and issues that affect you as the customer, your tattoo artist will be happy to speak to you about these aspects, and I would be worried if they didn’t want to.

Tattooing is an art form, and an incredibly difficult industry to get started in. It is very likely your tattoo artist has worked hard to collect knowledge and learn about tattooing specifics, and it is not really the ‘done thing’ in the industry to then impart this closely guarded knowledge willy nilly on everyone who asks.

LISTEN

When your tattoo is done, your artist will explain the aftercare process to you. You need to listen to their advice and follow it to the letter. If you do not feel the advice they have given is adequate, please ask them to explain or elaborate, so you can really understand the best way to care for your healing tattoo.

BE POLITE

ALWAYS say thank you, that’s just good manners!

PAY WELL

You should always bring plenty of money with you to pay for your tattoo. If you have been given a quote, try bring a little more, just in case. This means you can avoid embarrassing and unnecessary trips to a nearby cash point after your tattoo!

When the time is right, your artist may ask you to move to the reception area to make you payment, or wait until you indicate that you are ready. It can be a little awkward at this point, as paying for a tattoo is nothing like buying something from a shop, but I usually say something like ‘what’s the damage?’, ‘let’s square up!’ or simply ‘how much do I owe you?’. Keeping it light stops it from being awkward.

It is not compulsory to tip your tattoo artist, but it is polite and nice. Obviously it’s not always easy to afford this, as you may have had to save very long and hard to pay for the tattoo itself, but if you do have enough to say an extra ‘thank you’, it can be a great way of letting your artist know how much you appreciate their hard work, and it also helps to build a relationship with your artist. Everyone likes to be appreciated! It’s totally your call, but please at least consider it!

That’s all for the time being, check back in a couple of days, when I will share a short guide on the ‘After’ aspects of your tattoo!

Thanks for reading!

Kate xx

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The no-nonsense guide to getting tattooed! PART 1 – Before

Hello!

In this three part post, I thought I would talk about tattoos, because I love them, I have them and I am just about to get another!

What I REALLY want to attempt is a very simple, very straight-talking guide, to getting tattooed. I’m not just talking how to get what you want, what you should expect and how much you should pay, I’m also going to be brutally honest about how to be a good customer, how to trust your artist, and whether you really should be getting that tattoo at all!

The ‘before’ steps…

REALLY WANT A TATTOO?

Just ask yourself ‘why?’. Why do you want a tattoo.. disregard what the design is for a second, sit and think long and hard about that shit being permanent, and then ask again, why?

A lot of people wouldn’t expect me to say that. A lot of people want me to go ‘oh hey yeah, get tattooed, it’s the best ever’. But here’s why I won’t do that…. The only answer to the question ‘why?’ should be ‘for myself’.

Any reputable tattooist would never coerce or persuade you into getting tattooed, and any good friend wouldn’t either. Put simply, if you are asking the artist, or a friend, five minutes before the needle hits the skin ‘do you think I should get this?’ then you absolutely shouldn’t get it. You need to be 100% sure in your own head, without seeking approval first, that this is what you absolutely want to do.

WHAT SHOULD YOU GET?

By golly, this is a difficult one. Chances are, if you have no idea what to get as a tattoo, you really need to leave it be for a while, and wait until the inspiration comes to you. Don’t try seek something out just for the sake of getting it tattooed, I speak from experience, that you do not want to be left with two hearts’n’crossbones on your hips because you just wanted SOMETHING.

On the other hand, there is nothing wrong with getting a GOOD piece of flash tattooed. (Flash is the name given to the sheets of designs that hang in tattoo artists studios). By good, I mean a well sourced, well researched piece of flash. If you know what you like, chances are you know which artists flash to look for, and if you know who you want to get tattooed by (usually because you already like their style), there could be a piece of flash by them just waiting to adorn your skin. Generally though, it isn’t a great idea to walk into any old studio and just pick something. Do your research!!

I can’t tell you what to get tattooed, I can tell you what I think works, and what doesn’t work, what I think will be timeless, and what will date in five minutes, but ultimately, it’s up to you, and my opinions are just that.. opinions. I am no authority on tattoos, I don’t claim to be and I don’t want to be, but I won’t deny that I am somewhat informed.

You should probably avoid anything fad-like or something that will only be significant in the very near future. ‘Fashions’ in tattoos come and go, and have never made any sense to me. A tattoo is a very personal thing, so getting something because a celebrity has it, or a lot of other people have it, really isn’t a good reason.

There are a myriad of different styles of tattoo.. black and grey, traditional American, Japanese, realistic, abstract, bio-mechanical, tribal, new school… the list is pretty much endless, and it’s your choice, and ultimately yours alone as to what you want BUT….

TRUST IN YOUR TATTOO ARTIST!

If you have done your research carefully, and have chosen someone because you value their artistic vision, have faith in their technical ability and totally adore their work, then please, for the love of whatever god you do or do not believe in, just LISTEN TO THEM!!

If you have picked a truly great artist, then your tattoo artist knows best in terms of design, and the technical aspects of your tattoo. They know how close the lines can be, so it doesn’t turn into a blue blob in five years, they know whether something will look confusing if you try and add too many elements, they know that most of the time, subtlety can work wonders. If you disagree with anything your artist is trying to tell you regarding the design or technical elements of your tattoo, please don’t demand the tattoo ‘your way’, instead go away and think about it, or source a different tattoo artist to realise your vision.

I will mention here, that I realise if you have been looking at a design you want that you have seen on the internet, or in a book, or that a friend has drawn for you, that you will most likely want it to look EXACTLY how it does on paper. I can promise you though, that is not practical.

Many tattoo artists have to politely explain to customers that getting a design exactly as it appears on paper, or exactly how it was drawn by someone who isn’t a tattoo artist, isn’t a good idea. Put simply, your tattoo artist knows how a design will flow with the curves of your body, they know what kind of line thickness will be needed to achieve the best results, and they know how big and detailed they are physically able to go with something without it looking weird. Please be open to interpretations of your design, and work with your artist to create something that will really work on your body. I guarantee you, you will love it more than the original image!

HAVE A DECENT BUDGET

I am not about to tell you how much your tattoo should cost. I would never, ever attempt to do that. If you are totally new to getting tattooed, and you are worried because you have no idea what a reasonable price is, do your research and find well trusted, technically great artists to look into. Any decent artist would never hike the price up for a new customer, it’s bad for the industry and bad for their business personally, every good tattooer will quote you a reasonable price from the off.

I have had many conversations with people about the price of my tattoos, just as a hint though, it is a very rude question to ask someone.. you are essentially saying ‘how much money do you have?’.

There’s a saying, that translates perfectly to what you can expect for your money from a tattoo artists price quote. ‘Cheap work ain’t good, and good work ain’t cheap’. Be prepared to spend good money on that thing you so desperately want on your body forever, or you will quickly regret it!

Oh, and please understand.. Paying a deposit is not only normal, but extremely important. Your tattoo artist is committed to giving you the best tattoo they can, they need to know you are committed to getting it. Pay the deposit, don’t be difficult about it, and expect that if you cancel without adequate notice you will lose that deposit.

Please bear in mind that you are not just paying for the time it takes for the artist to expertly craft that tattoo into your skin. You also pay for their experience, their years of learning and knowledge that is being used to create something beautiful on your skin, the hours it takes to research to perfect reference material, the faffy task of placing orders for supplies, the lack of social life because of their dedication to the craft, the draft after draft of design, custom made for you, and the time taken to create a final drawing, which leads me onto..

DON’T WORRY ABOUT YOUR DESIGN

No one likes to be awoken at 1am by text message, when they were just trying to sleep. I’m pretty sure tattoo artists don’t like it either, but I know it happens. Don’t be that customer who texts, emails and calls into the studio, weeks before your appointment, to ‘have a look’ at the design.

Tattoo artists are busy people, the chances are, they haven’t even thought about your final design yet. A lot of artists draw up final designs just a day or two before your appointment. I appreciate this tattoo is important to you, but your artist has other clients, and is constantly working, they will get to your design when the time comes. This doesn’t mean they don’t care, they are simply doing their job.

If you need to constantly ask to see the design, this means that trust we talked about earlier isn’t there, and you need to re-think whether this is the right artist for you. Talking of re-thinking…

DON’T BE A NO-SHOW

Think about how long it’s taken on this blog post, for us to get to this point, and I still haven’t even mentioned anything about what happens when you actually get tattooed. Now imagine that all these things we have been through on this post, have actually happened and you have been planning, and have booked in, your tattoo. It can be a fairly long process, a fairly long and sometimes scary process, but it would be a great shame to spoil all the build up now by not showing up for your tattoo.

There are many reasons people don’t show up… fear, lack of funds, family disapproval, unable to get time off, etc.. but there is NO excuse for it (aside from maybe sudden hospitalisation or violent illness, but don’t lie… that shit’s just plain wrong)

Every tattoo artist would rather you let them know the very second you decide you won’t be able to make it, and also the reason. If you are scared, an artist would rather have the opportunity to put your mind at ease, and still be able to create that beautiful artwork for you, if you are broke, you need to suck that shit up, forget your pride, and be honest. Whatever the reason, you simply HAVE to tell them if you can’t make it.

Not turning up to your appointment is the equivalent of your work phoning you to say they don’t need you to go to work, and they won’t be paying you. Tattoo artists have rent to pay, they pay bills, they have to feed themselves, they also may have families to support, projects to fund or simply nice things they are saving up for. Please remember that!

If you let your artist know with enough time to spare, they may be able to move your appointment, instead of cancelling it, they will be able to book someone else in, so they still earn money that day, and most importantly for you, you won’t lose your deposit.

 

You’re almost ready for your tattoo! In part two, I will talk you through what to expect at your appointment, how to behave in the studio, and how to make the whole experience really enjoyable for you and your artist! Stay tuned, and if you have any questions for me, please ask!

Kate xx

New Project: The Paperchain Pen Pal Club

Hi all!

It’s been a while, and for that I apologise! I’m certainly not made of the right stuff to be a full time professional blogger, that’s for sure! But I will try my best to keep this more up to date now.. starting with my latest project!!

I have loved writing letters, ever since I was a tiny girl, and I still adore the postman bringing me lovingly hand written goodies.

I had been writing to my best friend on and off for a while, since she lives in another city, but recently wanted to collect an assortment of pen pals from all over the globe. I thought how cool would it be to have a service that would match up awesome letter-writing creative types from a carefully curated database? Then I thought, there’s no point waiting around for someone to do it… I SHOULD DO IT! Ans so… The Paperchain Pen Pal Club is born!

It’s in its very early stages now, and currently I need to collect as many members as possible, so there is lots of variety to choose from.

If you are interested in joining The Paperchain Pen Pal Club, please email thepaperchainclub@gmail.com and supply your address for post, some details about yourself (likes, dislikes, hobbies etc), a brief description of what you are looking for in a pen pal (e.g. similar, opposite, specific hobbies etc) and how many pen pals you would like to be writing to as a maximum.

To start with I will be capping membership at 50, to make it a little more special and close knit, but if it is a success, then who knows!

I have 8 pen pals personally, and tonight I wrote my first letter to my most recent pen pal!

letter

With all this correspondence coming through, I thought it would be a good idea to arrange a system so I would know when it was my turn to send, and when I would be waiting for a reply. I took an old corkboard that I had painted bright pink from a previous project, and added some decorative elements to the top (favourite postcards, paper letter banner and a photograph of me and a maid from a maid cafe in Tokyo). I then created headers of ‘sent’ and ‘received’, so I would know when I should be replying and when I have already sent out, and little markers for each of my pen pals (Japanese patterned papers with their names written on). My mum bought me the awesome button themed push pins, and they really tie the whole thing together!

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Stay tuned for more on my letter writing adventures, such as how I organise addresses, and my letter writing supplies, and also keep your eyes peeled for the fashion posts starting back up again alongside some craft items and articles!

Kate x

An Opinion – The Problem With Shiny Shopping Centres

There is a new shopping centre just opened in Leeds, where I live, called the Trinity Centre. It has been in progress for a very long time. One of it’s entrances is on Briggate, which until now has been Leeds’ main and perfectly adequate High Street. In this blog post I am going to air my views on this new shopping centre and also our habits on spending our money on the High Street, elaborating on a brief ranty Facebook status I posted earlier today..

So I went to visit the Trinity Centre yesterday, and all I can say is that it’s pretty soulless, clinical, and not very groundbreaking.

From what I could see, there were only a handful of independent shops, maybe four, tops.. and some of them were ‘pop-ups’. Independent businesses are what make each town or city different and they inject personality to town centres and high streets. Because of this they are very important to the identity of a place. It is disappointing to see that developers of these huge shopping centres cannot see this simple fact. Apparently smaller businesses were offered rent free periods to encourage them to take up spaces in the Trinity Centre, which is a great idea in principle.. but what happens when the rent free period runs out and they can’t afford the astronomical rent like Primark and Next can because these shopping centres with huge chains encourage people to think that they should only be spending their money on brands, and huge corporations?

I am sick and tired of seeing shop after shop of the same thing. I am not against High Street shops, I sometimes buy basics from H&M, food from Yo Sushi, etc.. but does Leeds really need two Primarks, two H&Ms, two large cinemas and a tonne of empty units on the street where brands have moved into the shiny new shopping centre? I think not. I believe shoppers are perfectly able to walk a few extra metres to get to the original Primark. If we are not careful, we will create a town centre with what I call the ‘Starbucks’ problem.. multiple carbon copies of stores along each street!

I understand these stores create much needed jobs (but with a majority of the stores just moving from the high street I have to wonder just how many jobs it has actually ‘created’) and I am glad that people who were looking for work now have steady incomes, but I have to wonder how many of these people would prefer to work for themselves, or in a different line of work entirely? Offering jobs doesn’t mean they’ve sorted peoples lives out, it’ll probably mean they will work themselves to misery in a huge chain store where their individual needs and personalities don’t really matter, maybe for decades.

It’s up to shoppers and normal everyday people to change the way the High Street works, and i’m disappointed that the general population are veering towards these big shiny stores because they think it’s progress. It is not progress… Progression would be realising the brainwashing abilities of these big brands and instead choosing to support businesses run by families, individuals, craftspeople.. vote with your feet people! If spending our money on products and services from independent traders becomes normal, we may encourage those who are longing to start a business, create a product or offer a service to do just that! It is hard to see the positives in starting your own business when you have to constantly and rather dishearteningly observe a society who will gladly ignore the little businesses.

Why is it the ‘norm’ to pay pennies for something we know will fall apart after we’ve washed it a few times, or eat food we know has arrived pre prepared in a truck from who-knows-where? It strikes me as far more ‘normal’ to pay a decent price for something that will last me forever, or eat food prepared fresh and pay a fair price for it, all the while knowing my money is going directly to the people that have actually earned it and not to a boardroom of decision makers with no connection to the average shopper, or you know.. that PERSON, whose hard earned money is being spent, which by the way, is YOU.. 

In conclusion, I don’t hate Trinity… I hate the way it’s been done, and I hate the way people have glorified it.. but most of all I hate what places like Trinity are doing to hard-working, independent businesses. 

A lot of people will disagree with me, and that’s okay.. I might be wrong about some things, but these are my opinions right now.

Kate x

An Introduction to Slimeball Zine

A slight break from style theme posts today.. I thought I would share with you all my experience co-creating and co-running an independent zine!

Slimeball Zine was dreamt up by myself and the wonderful Charli (of ValentineXO). We realised that we like a lot of the same things, we like to draw, write and be creative just for the sake of it and we like to share fun stuff with the world! 

The concept behind Slimeball Zine is that we wanted to create a fully independent publication that was completely free, unpretentious, inclusive and really good fun. Our choice to set a theme each month was brought about to provide inspiration for any creative types to base submissions around and also to ensure some variety in our issues. 

Me and Charli meet every Thursday evening to plan, draw, cut, stick and more for each months issue! We never wanted to rely on computers too much in the creation of each issue so you will usually find us slumped over the table physically writing out our editors letter or drawing little pictures to decorate the pages. There is something incredibly satisfying about making things with your hands and getting stuck in. When I draw, or type something on my typewriter, or cut out bits from magazines to collage together, or take photos for Slimeball, I feel part of a movement (okay maybe a movement of two for now) with the intention of getting back to true creativity, the bit in our brains that say ‘pick up the crayon and scribble’ when we are kids.

We work super hard on each issue and we do hope that shows! Details for how to be involved are at the end of my post, but for now.. onto the zine!

We launched with the ‘Teen Angst’ issue..

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We figured a launch issue about the awkwardness of your teenage years was perfect, and we brought it out in September which coincides perfectly with ‘back 2 skool’ vibes and fresh starts. Included in this issue were angsty playlists and film suggestions, reviews, an article, plenty of art and illustration, DIY tutorials, collages and more. This issue set the tone for what we wanted Slimeball to be about. There’s no minimalist pages, no posey posh paper and probably plenty of mistakes. It’s honest, it’s creative and it exists because we just wanted it to!

 

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We’re suckers for any kind of seasonal event so out October issue was obviously going to be vaguely Halloween themed! Charli did an AMAZING job of the cover, dragging Buffy back from the 90’s and planting her as our star! We had submissions for the first time in this one as we had invited all creative types to submit work! There were more tutorials, a whole story and photos too!

 

We decided to go with ‘Voyeurism’ as our November theme. This wasn’t a mistake, as we had some submissions which were great.. But this was definitely a pointer that we maybe shouldn’t make our themes so vague or cryptic. The issue itself was great but it didn’t seem to grab as much attention as previous months..

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I drew the cover for November, which I was happy with, and it made me want to draw more! As time goes on and we produce more issues, It’s becoming obvious that working on Slimeball has really encouraged the creative side of me to make stuff without needing a real reason, and without having to justify my creative choices through a sketchbook full of mistakes or a 1000 word essay, like you would if you were in school!

 

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December was all about things that make us feel good. We wanted the issue to be about ‘Comfort and Joy’, extending beyond Christmas too! We had a DIY den building article, a feel-good film list and a Yorkshire Pudding how-to! 

 

We decided to have a break in January, as things were manic after Christmas. We needed to wind down and plan.. We decided that our February issue would celebrate things that come in pairs and settled on the theme of ‘Just the Two of Us’. Choosing a theme is something we do quite impulsively. We try not to think too much about it as I wouldn’t want to find myself expecting certain types of submissions because I’ve chosen a very specific theme, but then also we don’t want the problem of too vague a theme cropping up again. I always love hearing feedback from people, so if you feel like you have come up with a killer theme for us don’t be shy to let us know!!

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To date, February is the latest issue we have created.. I drew this cover too, and thought the image of Sid and Nancy says so much about partnerships and pairings, the fun and spontaneity but also the destructive element that can sometimes arise too from being bound and linked to a person.

You may have noticed that the covers alternate in style, we take it in turns to create the front covers with me thinking up the September, November and February ones so far and Charli making the amazing October and December covers! I’m super excited to see Charli’s ‘Out of This World’ cover for March!

The latest (Just the Two of Us) issue has lots of submissions, which we love to see. The future of Slimeball now is in the submissions. It is a platform for all you creative people to make some art in any form to be shared! 

If you would like to be involved and be a Slimekid, please ‘like’ our page on facebook, which should appear if you search for ‘Slimeball Zine’. We would urge you to try get your hands on a copy too! Each month we only print 100 copies so the key is to get in there quick! Slimeball is stocked in Travelling Man, Pop Boutique, Mad Elizabeth, OK Comics, Birds Yard and Black Crown Tattoo in Leeds for free, but we are happy to post issues within the UK for 50p (just to cover postage!) and for a little bit more we will even send them to exotic lands!

To submit to Slimeball be sure to keep your eye on the Facebook page as that’s how we communicate to the Slimekids.. We are also on twitter too @slimeballzine. Once you know what the theme is and the deadline date you can get busy creating whatever it is you create which could be (but is not limited to) poetry, art, illustration, tutorials, articles, photos, collage, prose, stories, lists, reviews and whatever else you can think of!! We then ask that whatever you create be viewable in Black and White and make sense in A6 format. We don’t mind shrinking down A4 or A5 pieces on our copier, but please don’t write tiny or put teeny details in the original bigger drawing as this will get lost when we shrink it!

Once we receive submissions we decide which ones go in the issue based on whether they have the Slimeball feel to them. We are working on a way to showcase any submissions that we unfortunately don’t have room for in the zine by putting them online. We are also working on ways we can show off the work of video makers and other digital format artists online too!

All submissions must be sent to slimeballzine@gmail.com and we would love it if you could say whether you would like to be credited or not! You always get a copy posted to you if you submit too so please include your address in the email!

I hope I have given you a little glimpse inside what goes on at Slimeball HQ. We love the response we get from people who have experienced our little zine. Please.. spread the word and be a Slimekid 4 Life!

Kate xx

PS: March’s theme is ‘Out of This World’!

Happy Everything!!

Hey guuyyyyyssss,

How much do I suck? Not writing a shiny new blog post for aaaages and then coming back like nothing happened.

Did everyone have a nice holiday season? Good i’m glad.

I’m gearing up to get this blog looking sweeet in 2013 with a gazillion more posts (especially outfit posts!), the odd giveaway, DIY tutorial and other junk. Please comment with anything that you would like to see or just to tell me I suck!

Kicking off the shiny new year tomorrow with a nail tutorial! BOOM!

Byeeee

Kate x

Stuff We Forgot 20/12/12 – Fuzzy Felt!

Yes, this is meant to be primarily a style blog but, fuck it… I like toys. So my first ‘Stuff We Forgot’ post focuses on one of my most treasured childhood possessions.. FUZZY FELT!!

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I don’t wanna alienate anyone younger than me, but I definitely think my generation may have been one of the last to play with Fuzzy Felt. Sure, they still make it now, but it’s just not the same! Things have faces on the modern stuff, there’s no room for pure imagination to run wild!

When I was a child, I was given Fuzzy Felt to play with and my creativity took over, I still remember the crinkly blue plastic segments that held all of my precious shapes, and the thin cardboard ‘background’ which would be my canvas. I truly feel that Fuzzy Felt made me realise from quite a young age that ‘art’ didn’t have to be a drawing or a painting. And it didn’t have to last forever.

Fuzzy Felt was originally born in 1950, so the staying power of this fantastically simple toy is testament to it’s appeal. Maybe if todays kids weren’t so distracted by telly we would still see a hell of a lot more Fuzzy Felt magic!

It’s not particularly valuable if you have a vintage box today, but the satisfaction you will get from making a rude collage or dream home scene is beyond monetary value.

Finally, in combining style with toys.. imagine what Fuzzy Felt brooches could bring to an outfit! I love anything that reminds me of my childhood, I love anything childish in general. Felt brooches are all over Etsy right now, why not create a nostalgia laden Fuzzy Felt alternative.

On that note.. I’m getting myself on eBay… this is my new ‘thing’.

Sometimes I Think Things: The ‘P’ Word

Occasionally, I like to write serious things.. that are maybe a little bit challenging, funny, thought provoking etc (or maybe I THINK they are!) 

I thought I would share this article I wrote a while back as it is about being yourself, both in personality and style. It’s just a short one, it’s not fancy!

I originally wrote this piece for the zine I co-edit with my good friend Charli of Ruby Valentine. Our zine is called ‘Slimeball’ and is totally free. We explore monthly themes through creativity and regularly accept submissions from others. We love seeing how everyone else interprets the themes! 

If you would like any current/ back issues of Slimeball or if you would like to submit work please get in touch with us via our facebook page!

Here’s my article: The ‘P’ Word

The dreaded four words of my teenage years, the sentence which often solidified feelings of being misunderstood.

IT’S JUST A ‘PHASE’.

It’s the kind of comment that’s made by a parent in front of family friends at some kind of awkwardly enforced get-together, a comment which serves more to make the parent feel better than to actually explain anything. During my teens this little gem was whipped out to laugh away various risky subjects such as whichever bright colour I had chosen to dye my hair that week, why I insisted on wearing neon trousers or why I was being a complete bitch to my little brother.

I always felt like the ‘phase’ bomb was a way of making excuses for what I now know just to be teenage curiosity. Parents eager to tell the world I wouldn’t be like this forever.. it’s a temporary thing, i’m not a delinquent just yet.

Whenever ‘It’s Just A Phase’ was used, It would only serve to make me more determined to be that way forever, just to show them. Often I would verbally respond ‘We’ll see about that’ and argue that it would last. I wanted to be forever the rebel girl, with my ripped fishnets, terrible punk band, green hair and sulky face.

When I hit my twenties, I realised somewhere along the lines my aesthetic didn’t fit. I had morphed for years, moving organically from the 70’s tribute punk, to a less high maintenance punk look, to a jeans and t-shirt student, then a faux rockabilly style influenced only by a desire to be ‘cool’ before finally settling into this very eclectic mix of 1960’s vintage and ridiculous Harajuku inspired fashion, which is totally cool with me.

In that moment of realisation I also felt a swell of pride. Sure, the way I look might have changed, but my pride came from knowing that really… none of it was a ‘phase’. It was all me, It IS all me,and I still FEEL the same, I’d still describe myself as a rebellious individual, someone who challenges life, expectations and confines. I am still determined to ‘show them’, whoever ‘they’ present themselves to be.

What outwardly may be seen as others as a ‘phase’, I believe was integral to shaping me as a person. I look back and think, ‘But it was only my appearance’. I become genuinely baffled by the ‘phase’ excuse and why it even needed to be said. If a young person doesn’t experiment, or experience, or express then what kind of person will they grown into? And why are some appearances seen as ‘the norm’ while others have to be explained away with the P-word? Would it not be healthier to encourage transitions between styles, subcultures and interests instead of pigeon-holing everything into a ‘phase’ just for five minutes of a vague, self indulgent but totally imaginary, ‘grown up’ feeling?

Because finally, and this is another epiphany I have had in my twenties, let’s face it. Nobody ‘grows up’. We just get taller, sometimes fatter, and maybe a little better informed. Inside we are the same being as that teenager who was eternally jumping from one thing to another. That continuity of our personality and self is why really, there were never any ‘phases’.

© Kate Rosanne Johnson 2012

 

Kate xx